U.S. Spending $1.2 Billion For 300 Million Doses of Oxford University’s Corona Virus Vaccine

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freedom_faction #British drug manufacturer #AstraZeneca will receive more than $1 billion in U.S. funding to accelerate the development of #OxfordUniversity’s #coronavirus vaccine

300 Million Doses? 1 For Every American?

Nearly one third of the anticipated production will provide 300 million doses of the vaccine for the US.

RT reports: The US Department of Health will dole out $1.2 billion for 300 million doses of the vaccine, which is being created in conjunction with the University of Oxford. Health Secretary Alex Azar described the deal as a “major milestone” in US #PresidentDonaldTrump’s program to fast-track a Covid19 vaccine, dubbed: #OperationWarpSpeed.

AstraZeneca, based in Cambridge, England, says it will be able to manufacture around one billion doses of the vaccine, and hopes to begin deliveries in September. The UK government, which is also funding the project, has already secured 100 million doses.

Although billed as one of the best hopes of creating an effective antidote to coronavirus, initial trials of the vaccine, known as AZD1222, have had mixed results. In animal tests, all the monkeys injected with the vaccine ended up testing positive for Covid-19 after being introduced to the virus. However, the developers argued that the vaccine had successfully protected the animals from more severe infections.

The United States has taken heat for trying to pay to be first in line for any effective treatment. Washington has already awarded $30 million to France-based Sanofi, which is working on its own coronavirus vaccine. The company caused uproar among French government officials after it claimed that due to Washington’s generous financing the US would have first priority for any vaccine.

The pharmaceutical giant later backtracked, stating that they would be able to manufacture enough doses to meet demand both in the United States and across Europe.

#VaccineAgenda #Event201 #GlobalHealthSecurityAgenda

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