Promising Israeli Research Shows Cannabis May Protect Against COVID19

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Certain #cannabis strains may have the potential to protect the body against #Covid19 infection, as revealed by researchers at the #UniversityofLethbridge earlier this month.

After studying over 400 #marijuana strains, the #Canadian researchers found around a dozen of which show promise in protecting users from becoming infected with the #coronavirus, a discovery which will surely cause #cannabis users to rejoice.

The treatment works by limiting the number of virus receptors in which Covid-19 attaches to, such as those in the lungs, intestines, and mouth. “If they can reduce the number of receptors, there’s much less chance of getting infected,” said lead researcher Dr. Igor Kovalchuk. “[As] a number of them have reduced the number of these (virus) receptors by 73 per cent, the chance of it getting in is much lower.” – Dr. Kovalchuk, Biological Scientist

Scientists still have not found a proper balance between #tetrahydrocannabinol (#THC) and #cannabidiol (#CBD) content when used for this purpose, but they generally favor CBD, in part because of its anti-inflammatory properties. “It will take a long time to find what the active ingredient is — there may be many … [but] we focus more on the higher CBD because people can take higher doses and not be impaired.” – Dr. Kovalchuk

Cannabis-based products may soon be used in conjunction with other promising therapies like Intravenous #VitaminC and #Hydroxychloroquine for treating and preventing coronavirus.

Referring to cannabis, Kovalchuk states, “it would be cheaper for people and have a lot less side-effects,” says Kovalchuk, but there haven’t yet been any clinical trials, only research into the effect of cannabis compounds on ‘artificial human 3D tissue models,’ which sets up a significant hurdle for the research.

However, scientists in Israel have also started clinical trials to research the potential impact that CBD has in repairing Covid-19 damaged cells. “Our work could have a huge influence — there aren’t many drugs that have the potential of reducing infection by 70 to 80 per cent,” said Dr. Kovalchuk.

“Researchers were able to identify 13 CBD extracts that are able to change ACE2 levels, an enzyme previously linked to COVID-19 infection. The data also suggested that some strains were also able to control serine protease TMPRSS2, which is another protein necessary for COVID-19 to enter host cells and spread throughout the body.” ~The Source

Considering the current global situation of authoritarian lockdowns and uncertainty surrounding a potential vaccine, it is imperative that we look at alternative treatments and preventative measures to the virus that don’t cause dangerous side effects, or result in the loss of liberty.

If their research is successful, it could lead to a cheap and effective therapy for the novel virus in the form of cannabis gel caps, sprays, and mouth wash. According to Kovalchuk, “the extracts of our most successful and novel high CBD C sativa lines, pending further investigation, may become a useful and safe addition to the treatment of COVID-19 as an adjunct therapy.”

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COVID Reference

Six weeks after the third edition, the world has changed again.
The pandemic is raging in South America, particularly in Brazil,
Ecuador and Peru. SARS-CoV-2 is under control in China, but in
Iran it is not. And in Europe, where most countries have weathered
the first wave and open borders to save a compromised tourist season, is now wondering if and for how long this biological
drôle de guerre could last.

Science has moved ahead, too. We have seen a more complex
picture of COVID-19 and new clinical syndromes; the first data
from vaccine trials; first results from randomized controlled
drug studies; encouraging publications on monoclonal neutralizing antibodies and serological evidence about the number of people who have come into contact with SARS-CoV-2. Unfortunately, we have also seen the first science scandal with fake data published in highly ranked journals. And we face new challenges like long-term effects of COVID-19 and a Kawasaki-like inflammatory multisystem syndrome in children.

For quite some time, prevention will continue to be the primary
pillar of pandemic control. In future waves of the SARS-CoV-2
pandemic, we will focus on the conditions under which SARSCoV-
2 is best transmitted: crowded, closed (and noisy) places and
spaces. Although hospitals are not noisy, they are crowded and
closed, and the battle against the new coronavirus will be decided
at the very center of our healthcare system. Over the next
months and maybe years, one of all of our top priorities will be
to give all healthcare workers and patients perfect personal protective equipment.

New insights on the antiviral effects of chloroquine against coronavirus: what to expect for COVID-19?

Recently, a novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), officially known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), emerged in China. Despite drastic containment measures, the spread of this virus is ongoing. SARS-CoV-2 is the aetiological agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) characterised by pulmonary infection in humans. The efforts of international health authorities have since focused on rapid diagnosis and isolation of patients as well as the search for therapies able to counter the most severe effects of the disease. In the absence of a known efficient therapy and because of the situation of a public health emergency, it made sense to investigate the possible effect of chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine against SARS-CoV-2 since this molecule was previously described as a potent inhibitor of most coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-1. Preliminary trials of chloroquine repurposing in the treatment of COVID- 19 in China have been encouraging, leading to several new trials. Here we discuss the possible mechanisms of chloroquine interference with the SARS-CoV-2 replication cycle.

Efficacy of hydroxychloroquine in patients with COVID-19: results of a randomized clinical trial

Despite our small number of cases, the potential of HCQ in the treatment of COVID-19 has been partially confirmed. Considering that there is no better option at present, it is a promising practice to apply HCQ to COVID-19 under reasonable management. However, Large-scale clinical and basic research is still needed to clarify its specific mechanism and to continuously optimize the treatment plan.

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