Macron Rejects Tearing Down Statues in France

Follow us on social media

But Macron said the country would not obscure elements of its history or dismantle statues of public figures who may have advocated racist views or policies. “The Republic will not wipe away any trace or any name from its history. It will not forget any of its works. It will not take down any of its statues but lucidly look at out history and our memory together,” he said.

He said this was especially important in Africa, where French colonial rule in several countries left a legacy that remains a subject of anger for many to this day.

Together, France and Africa need to find a “present and a future that is possible on both sides of the Mediterranean”, he said.

In a sign of the sensitivities in France, former prime minister Jean-Marc Ayrault had Saturday urged a new designation for a hall in parliament named after the 17th-century statesman Jean-Baptiste Colbert. It was Colbert who drew up the “Code Noir” that defined the conditions for slavery. – ‘Police deserve support’ –

Several demonstrations against racism and police violence against minorities have erupted in French cities in recent weeks, given impetus by the death in police custody of George Floyd in the US.

Protesters have rallied in particular around the case of a young black man, Adama Traore, who died in custody in 2016, a case that remains under investigation.

Twenty-one people have been placed under arrest over their actions in a demonstration in Paris in Saturday that ended in clashes with police, prosecutors said.

Macron acknowledged that France had to fight against the fact that “the name, the address, the colour of the skin” can affect a person’s chances in their lives. “We will be uncompromising against racism, anti-Semitism and discrimination. New decisions for equality will be taken,” he said. “It is necessary to unite around Republican patriotism. We are a nation where everyone — whatever their origin and religion — can find their place,” he said. “Is this true everywhere and for everyone? No,” he admitted.

Human Rights Watch said Sunday that France should halt identity checks by the police that are “abusive and discriminatory” towards black and Arab males.

But Macron defended France’s under-fire police force, saying they “deserve public support and the recognition of the nation for their work.” “Without Republican order there cannot be security or freedom,” he said.

He warned that the fight against racism became distorted when it became exploited by what he described as “separatists.” Police have themselves protested against what they perceive as a lack of backing from the government and in particular Interior Minister Christophe Castaner.

Several dozen police held a surprise nighttime protest late Saturday in central Paris, parking their police cars by the Arc de Triomphe and flashing their lights.

Related Articles

The HPV Vaccine: An Ethical Dilemma

In 2014 there were numerous reports of mass hysteria and mystery illnesses spreading around the small town of El Carmen De Bolivar, Colombia. According to an article published by CBS, there was a steady increase of young women being hospitalized in this small town, all of which reported the same symptoms of fainting, numbness and tingling of the hands and feet, and headaches. Speculations about the Gardasil vaccination arose, but were disregarded by the mayor of the town stating that “there is no evidence the vaccine, which has undergone extensive testing and regulation is to blame” (CBS, 2014). According to this statement, he is not necessarily wrong, because the clinical trials of this vaccine have been proven to have misleading conclusions due to errors in the study design.

COVID Reference

Six weeks after the third edition, the world has changed again.
The pandemic is raging in South America, particularly in Brazil,
Ecuador and Peru. SARS-CoV-2 is under control in China, but in
Iran it is not. And in Europe, where most countries have weathered
the first wave and open borders to save a compromised tourist season, is now wondering if and for how long this biological
drôle de guerre could last.

Science has moved ahead, too. We have seen a more complex
picture of COVID-19 and new clinical syndromes; the first data
from vaccine trials; first results from randomized controlled
drug studies; encouraging publications on monoclonal neutralizing antibodies and serological evidence about the number of people who have come into contact with SARS-CoV-2. Unfortunately, we have also seen the first science scandal with fake data published in highly ranked journals. And we face new challenges like long-term effects of COVID-19 and a Kawasaki-like inflammatory multisystem syndrome in children.

For quite some time, prevention will continue to be the primary
pillar of pandemic control. In future waves of the SARS-CoV-2
pandemic, we will focus on the conditions under which SARSCoV-
2 is best transmitted: crowded, closed (and noisy) places and
spaces. Although hospitals are not noisy, they are crowded and
closed, and the battle against the new coronavirus will be decided
at the very center of our healthcare system. Over the next
months and maybe years, one of all of our top priorities will be
to give all healthcare workers and patients perfect personal protective equipment.

Spotlight Grows on Mysterious ‘Suicide’ of Dr. Fauci’s Right-Hand Man at NIAID; Dr. Judy Mikovits Says Top Scientist Was “Suicided” to Silence Him

Top virologist Dr. Judy Mikovits is shedding some well-needed light on the mysterious death of top scientist Kuan-Teh Jeang, who was second in charge under Dr. Anthony Anthony Fauci at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the time of his controversial death. Mikovits detailed on the Thomas Paine Podcast that Jeang, who was 54, was poised to blow the whistle on falsified government research, fake clinical data and widespread vaccine fraud that was killing Americans before his untimely demise.

Responses