DOJ “Whistleblower” Admits to Seeking Job W/ House Democrats During Trump Impeachment

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Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., had a testy exchange Wednesday with a Justice Department whistleblower who admitted during a House Judiciary Committee hearing that he sought to work House Democrats during the Trump impeachment proceedings.

John Elias, a senior career official in the Justice Department’s antitrust division, is one of two whistleblowers who testified before the Democrat-led committee on alleged politically-motivated overreach by Attorney General William Barr and other appointees. During his testimony, Elias accused his supervisors of improperly investigating mergers involving cannabis companies because of a “personal dislike of the industry.” Collins questioned Elias on his own political background, asking the official if he considered himself to be nonpartisan at work. When Elias responded that he did, Collins asked him if he had ever sought to work with Democratic leaders on the House Judiciary Committee. “I, like people, over time have explored various career options,” Elias said, adding that he had a “very preliminary conversation” with House Democrats about a position.

Collins pressed Elias on his conversations with Democrats and whether he had sought a position to work with them during the Trump impeachment. Initially, Elias said he had asked to work on antitrust policy. “Did you not ask to be detailed to the committee’s work on oversight during impeachment? Is that not correct? Refresh your memory,” Collins said. “I may have also asked for oversight at one point – with the blessing of assistant attorney,” Elias responded.

House Democrats began investing claims earlier this year that Barr engaged in politically motivated overreach as attorney general. The second whistleblower, former Justice Department Aaron Zelinsky, testified that Barr and senior staffers gave preferential treatment to Roger Stone during sentencing proceedings due to his relationship with Trump.

Barr is expected to testify before the committee next month.

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COVID Reference

Six weeks after the third edition, the world has changed again.
The pandemic is raging in South America, particularly in Brazil,
Ecuador and Peru. SARS-CoV-2 is under control in China, but in
Iran it is not. And in Europe, where most countries have weathered
the first wave and open borders to save a compromised tourist season, is now wondering if and for how long this biological
drôle de guerre could last.

Science has moved ahead, too. We have seen a more complex
picture of COVID-19 and new clinical syndromes; the first data
from vaccine trials; first results from randomized controlled
drug studies; encouraging publications on monoclonal neutralizing antibodies and serological evidence about the number of people who have come into contact with SARS-CoV-2. Unfortunately, we have also seen the first science scandal with fake data published in highly ranked journals. And we face new challenges like long-term effects of COVID-19 and a Kawasaki-like inflammatory multisystem syndrome in children.

For quite some time, prevention will continue to be the primary
pillar of pandemic control. In future waves of the SARS-CoV-2
pandemic, we will focus on the conditions under which SARSCoV-
2 is best transmitted: crowded, closed (and noisy) places and
spaces. Although hospitals are not noisy, they are crowded and
closed, and the battle against the new coronavirus will be decided
at the very center of our healthcare system. Over the next
months and maybe years, one of all of our top priorities will be
to give all healthcare workers and patients perfect personal protective equipment.

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